Northeast Ohio trucking job

Overcoming Misconceptions About Ohio Trucking Jobs

Many trucking companies are advertising openings for Northeast Ohio trucking jobs – increasingly finding themselves face-to-face with outdated misconceptions about what it means to be a truck driver. Some potential candidates are deterred by pursuing an occupation they erroneously perceive as a low-skill, low-education, low-wage. In fact, as our Cleveland trucking company can firmly attest, these are all myths (albeit persistent ones, unfortunately).

The American Trucking Association reports there is a national truck driver shortage of about 80,000 drivers. This has been a long-simmering issue, but it’s been exacerbated in recent months by the huge spikes in retail sales and e-commerce demands, which have led to massive supply chain bottlenecks.

Ohio trucking jobs – particularly those for heavy and tractor trailer operators – are among the 25 occupations the Ohio Department of Job & Family Services expects to have the most opening through the next seven years. Just within the last month, the Ohio Bureau of Labor Market Information reported there were 72,400 transportation jobs posted. Job ads for big rig operators are No. 2, just after postings seeking registered nurses.

Although it’s true that truckers at some companies have not had the best experiences, that’s far from the universal reality. Just like any industry, trucking and transportation has great employers, and others that fall short. Regrettably, it’s the unfavorable impressions that have been seared into the collective conscience. It’s far past time that changes. As a longtime Cleveland trucking service provider, our low turnover rate and high employee satisfaction soundly belies these assumptions.

The Truth About Northeast Ohio Trucking Jobs

The fact of the matter is that on average, entry-level truck drivers can sometimes earn double the starting salary of many of today’s college graduates. It’s not uncommon for those who pass their commercial driver’s education courses (which typically take 3-6-months) to immediately be approached by multiple job offers. Some new drivers find they’re being offered positions before their training is even complete.

Trucking is an attractive proposition for professionals – one that does require skill. Just as it is with the trades (electricians, plumbers, masons, carpenters, etc.), the commitment and contributions of truckers hasn’t historically been celebrated the way they should have been. We are however seeing a definite shift, particularly as the pandemic has highlighted how vital these professionals are to the function of daily life in this country.