Impact of COVID-19 on Ohio Trucking Services

The extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic has affected Ohio trucking services depends largely on the size and capacity of the trucking company, the kind of goods typically hauled and their diversity of services.

Motor carriers moving things like groceries, medical supplies and some retail goods have been busy. Those serving manufacturing industries have slowed following closures of non-essential factories. Overall, freight volumes are down, but capacity is up for spot market trucking services (one-time, inconsistent load volume orders for specific origins and destinations) and hot shot trucking (single-customer, expedited hauls that reduce downtime and often lower costs). Low spot market prices have reduced demand and volumes for longer-term contract trucking.

Businesses are doing what they must to survive. Our team at On Time Delivery & Warehouse offers a broad range of competitively-priced Ohio trucking services that can be quickly on-boarded and tailored to your needs – whether that’s now, three weeks from now or next year.

Cleveland truck driver

Our Cleveland Truck Drivers Keep Supply Chains Moving

In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, our Cleveland truck drivers at On Time Delivery & Warehouse have been committed to keeping the supply chain moving as quickly and efficiently as possible.

We are navigating a growing number of challenges on highways and at loading docks, working to meet the spiking demand for medical equipment and key consumer staples. Numerous truck stop restaurants have closed their doors in compliance with the orders of public health officials, though some are still offering takeout service. In some states, such as Pennsylvania, rest stops along critical logistics routes have been closed too (about a dozen were later reopened). This is problematic because these aren’t simply locations to pick up snacks and use the restrooms; they’re critical places for long-haul truckers to sleep.

We’re also working with customers who are asking Cleveland truck drivers to remain in their trucks and use paper or electronic methods for payments and signatures for deliveries and pickups. A number of receiving docks have put in place additional restrictions if they originated or traveled through states that are considered “hot zones” of the virus. Some receivers and shippers are requesting truckers sign affidavits indicating they are not experiencing symptoms.